Stress Management 101

We all have stress…I mean it’s normal, right?!  Yes, absolutely.  So when does stress become harmful  and what can you do to reduce stress’ harmful effects on your mental and physical health?  Read on to answer those questions.

With the recent election, the campaigning prior to the election, and the reactions of Americans since the election, there has been a lot of stress felt across our country.  I don’t know about you, but just reading my FB feed has become stressful and occasionally traumatic.  In addition, we’re all beginning to plan for the upcoming holiday events, thinking about having family members together who don’t always get along, and how to discuss politics around the family table.  Needless to say, we are surrounded by stress and stressful events.

Did you know there are actually two kinds of stress?  There is good stress (eustress) and bad stress (distress).  Good stress helps us focus, proves a sense of urgency, and can help us complete tasks more efficiently.  Distress, on the other hand, causes a host of physical and mental symptoms that can actually keep us from doing our best work and living our best lives.

There is another differentiating factor to stress, too: acute versus chronic stress.  Acute stress is felt when someone is approaching a deadline.  It lasts for a finite amount of time and for a specific reason.  Chronic stress is a heightened amount of stress for a prolonged amount of time.  It’s as though your daily “bar” or threshold for stress is at a higher level than before and it begins to seem like your new normal.

What are some examples of events or interactions that cause stress?

  • discontent at work
  • fear of termination/loss of a job
  • relationship or family trouble
  • illness or death of a loved one
  • planning events (weddings, anniversaries, birthday parties)
  • getting married, divorce, separation
  • moving
  • financial obligations
  • traumatic events
  • family get-togethers
  • having a baby
  • TV, news media, social media

Many of us believe that a little stress is normal, and that it might even help us perform better.  The problem is that we say we can handle a little stress to finish a project, or to finish planning an event, but then one project leads to another and then another and soon our stress level is increased indefinitely.

So what does stress actually do to us, anyway? How would I know if I’m experiencing the effects of stress?  If you are experiencing any of the following, you’re likely experiencing stress at a moderate to high level.  (If these symptoms are prolonged or intense you may need to seek medical assessment and treatment.)

  • headaches
  • chest pain
  • high blood pressure
  • fatigue or trouble sleeping
  • upset stomach & digestive issues
  • anger or irritability
  • sadness or depression
  • overeating, over drinking
  • anxiety
  • weight gain or loss
  • skin conditions
  • nail biting, leg bouncing
  • loneliness/isolation
  • having a negative perspective on most life events

For women, some effects of stress are even more pronounced.

  • Women are 10 times more likely than men to develop eating disorders due to stress
  • stomach issues
  • skin reactions
  • sleep deprivation
  • difficulty concentrating
  • heart disease/heart attacks
  • cancer/breast cancer
  • lowered immune response

So what can you do to help prevent, treat, or combat your high stress levels?  There are many things you can do.  Below is a diverse list of activities, but it’s far from exhaustive.

  • watch a comedy movie or attend a comedy show
  • play with a pet
  • get a manicure or pedicure
  • get a massage
  • read a book for pleasure
  • savor coffee or hot tea
  • journal your stress, emotional responses
  • journal about your hopes and dreams
  • practice a deep relaxation exercise
  • add breathing techniques into your day
  • move your body
    • 10 minute movements throughout the day
    • standing from your office chair every hour
    • walking around the office or around the block
  • meditation
  • yoga
  • stretching
  • improve your diet
    • eat quality protein, veggies, Omega-3 fatty acids, ginger
  • get enough sleep
  • socialize–spend face-to-face time with friends
  • dance
  • avoid drama
  • take a bath
  • take a walk
  • reduce screen time (TV, computer, phone, tablet, video games)
  • Avoid stressors (such as the news, scary movies, social media negativity)
  • express your feelings to trusted friends, family members, or colleagues
  • laugh
  • put things into perspective
  • connect with nature
  • slow down, live in the present moment
  • use your five senses–notice smells, what colors do you see, notice how something feels in your fingers, what do you hear, how does something taste
    • actually take time to intentionally feel the lotion you’re putting on your hands
    • notice the warmth of the blanket you’re napping under
    • notice the color in the leaves of the trees
    • smell the dinner your partner is cooking
    • see the food you ordered at a restaurant before taking a picture of it for social media
  • spend time doing things you enjoy (hobbies, athletics, museums, etc.)
  • learn to say “no” without feeling guilty
  • light a candle
  • reduce your caffeine intake
  • take time to relax
  • use your vacation time
  • cook or bake
  • practice gratitude: what are you thankful for, experience the gratitude, share gratitude with others

Perhaps most important is that we reflect on our current situation and STOP EXCUSING our level of stress thinking “let me just get through this one __________ (project, dinner, event, etc.)” because what inevitably happens is that one project or deadline leads into the next and the next.  We MUST prioritize our health, wellness, and sanity by prioritizing our stress management.  We can do this by creating a daily or weekly routine for self-care.

What could you be doing on a daily, weekly, monthly, quarterly, and annual basis to care for yourself? 

Some ideas for each time frame are below. (Many of the things listed below could occur more often than I’m suggesting here–there is no limit to your self-care routine!)

Annually: take a vacation, use your sick time, attend a conference, take a class
Quarterly: review the goals you’ve achieved, go to the movies, attend a theater production
Monthly: date nights, coffee with a friend, massage, send a card to someone
Weekly: religious event, counseling appointment, yoga, manicure, dance, sing
Daily: breathing technique, take a walk, journal your gratitude, walk your dog, love

While it’s true we all have stress in our lives, what we don’t all have is an intentional practice for managing our stress.  If you would like to create a self-care routine, or if you have a vision for your life that you would like to clarify or achieve, please email me at Nikki@GroundedVisionCoaching.com.  I offer free discovery coaching sessions and I’d love to see how I can serve you and if we would be a good fit to work together.

Dr. Nikki Tobias
Certified Life & Career Coach
Grounded Vision Coaching & Consulting

Nikki@GroundedVisionCoaching.com
(717)515-0820

The Day I Took A Technology Break

I remember the day well, Tuesday, January 26th. The day I logged off all social media sites. Why did I decide to log off? I was exhausted. 

I was smack in the middle (day 5 of 10) of my fourth round of antibiotics in four months. To say I was exhausted doesn’t actually convey the extent of my illness. I mean, this was beyond the typical levels of exhausted brought about by a life that involves too much coffee, not enough sleep and chasing small children. This was more than racing to meet deadlines, draft programs and get the holiday cheer wrapped and under the tree. This was a bona fide sick, and no matter what I did, I wasn’t getting any better. 

Yes, I know that might sound overly dramatic. Still, as I sat watching my child’s dance class I contemplated every angle of planning necessary for a childfree weekend on a secluded beach. 

The lynchpin of my fantasy: the elusive lack of any and all cell phone service. 

The notion of being ‘unreachable’ filled me with a blissful and giddy glee. Just meditation, barefoot walks on warm sand, uninterrupted, leisurely time with the love of my life and perhaps an exotic cocktail or two. Quickly (and sadly) I realized the beach weekend was a bust. However,  I also realized what I was truly longing for: the coveted ‘unreachable’ status. That was something I could do.  Yes, it was something I would do.

I was instantly at peace with the decision to unplug. I moved quickly and decisively – choosing a day with an already light schedule. Just a month before I had published my one word manifesto of 2016: Me! In the last days of 2015 I embraced the search for the word I would claim as a beacon for the New Year.  Me with a deliberately capitalized M – the Me of my higher, enlightened Self. I had pledged to practice radical self-care, to heal my body and spirit, exiting the antibiotic roller coaster once and for all. 

What could be more in line with beacon of Me? Unplugging Me was the first expression of radical self-care of 2016 and it went without a hitch. In a dark hour of illness I unplugged leaving this note on my social media pages: 

“They say everything will work better if you unplug it for a while. I’m unplugging Me for the next 24 hours. All sessions will commence as planned. Please call with any questions or to book an appointment.” 

On January 26th I embraced my first act of radical, unapologetic self-care. In the process I enjoyed a hot cup of coffee while it was still hot. Seems my coffee grew cold while I was scrolling through feeds and re-tweeting the profound wisdom of fellow coaches. No one complained, no clients balked, and I came back refreshed, invigorated and engaged.  

The lack of excess static was refreshing, so refreshing this unplugged day has become my monthly retreat and gift of self care to myself.


Jennifer Bellber is a Certified Professional Life Coach & Energy Leadership Index Master Practitioner. She's a wife, mother of a toddler, sometimes blogger, photographer for fun and charitable causes, slow runner and weight lifting enthusiast who reduced her physical self by 120 pounds a few years ago. 

Jennifer's passion is helping overwhelmed parents figure out who they want to be when their kids grow up, ditch the Mommy Guilt (or Daddy Guilt as the case may be) and live a connected, empowered, wickedly amazing sexy life of their own design.

To learn more about Jennifer, visit: www.jenniferbellber.com

Source: www.jenniferbellber.com

Remember The Caregivers!

(Editor’s Note: Gina & Russ – fellow coaches and friends in New Jersey – have different cancer experiences and collaborated on this blog for the benefit of you and those around you.)

GINA:

Sometimes we are so caught up in our recovery that we forget about the needs of others. It wasn’t until almost a year after my first surgery for a double mastectomy that I became aware of what my husband was going through in terms of my cancer diagnosis. I was so involved in taking an active role in my recovery (not to say that this is not a positive action) and the well-being of my children that it didn’t even dawn on me what my husband was going through in the process and I don’t even think he thought about himself either since his primary focus was caring for me.   So this one day about a year after my surgeries and treatment we were having a discussion and he described to me how difficult it was for him not to worry about recurrence of my cancer and it opened up a door to a conversation about the emotions of what he had been feeling all throughout the year long experience we had been through.

I was actually devastated at the thought that I hadn’t even been focusing on what he was going through internally. Caregivers, while they are carrying their own burden can sometimes get lost in the journey. We have to be consciously aware of the emotions that they are going through in the process as well and this is why it is so important for caregivers to feed themselves while caring for their loves ones and for us as survivors, even though we are carrying our own load, to recognize the pain of what our caregivers are experiencing and to simply say: “Thank you” for remaining by our side.

When we look back it’s all so simple, all we have to do is have a conversation, speak up, express our feelings and ask for what we need and what the other person needs in return even if we are afraid to do so.

It’s all about fluid conversations and getting past our fears so that we can remain united and healthy in facing our journey together.

So today, I ask that you tell your caregiver how much their love and support has meant to you on your journey and to ask them what they are experiencing and feeling so that you can give back to them in return.

RUSS:

Gina makes such excellent points.  I so admire her for her strength and insight (and of course her friendship).  Luckily for me, I haven’t been diagnosed with cancer.  My Mom has though – Stage Zero Breast Cancer this Summer.  I can say now that it has had a happy ending.  She’s finished with her radiation and doesn’t need chemo.  Thank goodness.  We’re all very grateful. 

Overall, my experience as a caregiver was positive, because of the support of those around me.  I needed them just like my Mom needed me.  Somewhat early on in her process of dealing with the cancer, I asked if it was alright with her if I posted about it on my Facebook, and luckily for me, she said “please do whatever it takes to get the support you want and need”.  Because of the work I do as an Entrepreneur and Coach, my use of social media is rather frequent and I talk a lot about what’s going on in my life personally and professionally.  For that period where I was coming to terms with what may happen and what was happening, but hadn’t mentioned it broadly, I felt as if I wasn’t living an authentic life.  For me, talking about it publicly was needed.  Much-needed actually.  Once I announced it, the floodgates opened with love and support that still hasn’t stopped 3.5 months later.  It energizes me, and my Mom, who very much appreciates the kind words from people she’s met and many she’s never met.

This may resonate with you, or you may have a very different style.  Whatever you need is your decision, and I’d bet that the people around you will support you in however you want to be treated. 

Here’s my message for everyone reading this:  If you’re a patient, carve out just a little time for the caregivers in your life.  If you’re a caregiver, take time for your own self-care.  Think about what you need and then don’t be shy in telling others.  Lastly, if you know a caregiver, ask them what they need and how you can best support them.

Good luck on your journey!

Love,

Gina & Russ


Gina Costa-Goldfarb is a breast cancer survivor and Certified Professional Coach. She helps women diagnosed with breast cancer cope, step by step, with the emotional and physical challenges they experience, so they gain confidence and feel in control of their life again. For more on her, go to www.newbeginningswithgina.com.


Russ Terry is a Gratitude guru who’s helping to make the world a happier and more grateful place.  Earlier this year, he published his first book:  My Gratitude Journal:  365 days of the people & things I’m grateful for and the lessons you can learn from them.  He has two more books on Gratitude due out in 2015. For more on him, go to www.russterrylifecoach.com.

“MAT PRACTICE” INTO “LIFE PRACTICE”

Although I love yoga, I almost did not show up for my yoga class that morning. It was a rushed morning and the weather outside even justified my not going into class. I also thought that I am late anyway and may not even get a spot in the class. Something made me just get up and say that even if I was going to be a little late for class, it should be all right.  Worse case, if I did not get a spot, I would just walk around and come back. I knew that if I did make it, I would feel better after the session because I had shown up and had done my practice and I would be left with a lot of energy. As I walked in to the room, there was a place for me and I felt like it was a sign. I settled and started my Vinyasa flow.  What I realized that day was, how what we do on our mat is what we need to do in life too.

1. Showing up is so important: More than anything else is showing up on your mat just as important as showing up in life.

2. Unsure about what happens: No matter how many years we practice yoga, each day or each practice session is different. We don’t know what happens on the mat on that particular day just as in life things that happen are not always known.

3. Continuing to breathe: No matter what we are doing on the mat, the focus is the breath because it is the breath that helps get through the different poses or the challenge on the mat just as in real life we are faced with different challenges at all times and the key is to get comfortable breathing through whatever it is that is happening.

4. Don’t worry about what happens on other’s mats: when we start to look around to see what others are doing on their mat, we lose focus of what we are doing and we end up losing our balance. Similarly, in life when we compare ourselves with others and focus on what others are doing, we lose focus on what we need to do. Of course, its always great to have people around us inspire us, but do not get intimidated by what others are doing. Focus on your strengths.

5. Learning to be present: On the mat, it’s all about being present. We may be faced with worries from the past or about the future but what helps us stay focused is being present in that moment. Similarly in life we will be faced with stress, anxiety, emotions or worries about events that have occurred or what may occur, but we need to learn to acknowledge them, feel them and then come back to the present.

6. Learning to let go of what is not serving us: Just as you release the thoughts that no longer serve you during your practice, you do so the same in life. You learn to let go of past grudges, physically letting go of the things around us that no longer serve us and are blocking better things from coming into our lives because of the place we have given them in our life.

7. Acknowledge ourselves: after the practice session, we learn to acknowledge ourselves and feel good about facing whatever the challenges that we did on the mat for that day, similarly we need to learn to acknowledge ourselves in life to get past our challenges.


Kalpana is a certified Life Coach (ICF) and a certified Eating Psychology Coach from The Institute For The Psychology Of Eating. Her main goal in her coaching practice is to help people to love themselves "now" as opposed to waiting to do that only when they "get there." She has a true passion for helping people cultivate unconditional love for themselves, and helping people to form healthy relationships with food.

What Is Weighing You Down?

Weight loss can be as simple as “Exercise more and eat less”! That can work but short term only. The weight that is lost in this way will almost always come back because we have not gone to the root of the problem. We have not figured out what is weighing us down.

Many of us are carrying emotional baggage from past hurt, from abusive/unhappy relationships, not being able to pursue our passion, lack of love, being lonely, past guilt or shame (which is a big one). When we have not healed these emotional issues it becomes hard to “move”.

What can we do to help heal ourselves and in turn be able to get up and “move”?

1. Forgive others and forgive yourself

2. Keep communication open in our relationships and pay attention to what is not working

3. Always spend some time in doing what makes us happy i.e pursuing a hobby, a sport, spending time with friends

4. Seek professional help i.e coaching/ counseling if it seems like it will help

5. Taking lots of deep breaths, laughing out loud and loving ourselves and our loved ones more!!!


Kalpana is a certified Life Coach (ICF) and a certified Eating Psychology Coach from The Institute For The Psychology Of Eating. Her main goal in her coaching practice is to help people to love themselves "now" as opposed to waiting to do that only when they "get there." She has a true passion for helping people cultivate unconditional love for themselves, and helping people to form healthy relationships with food.

 

How to Fight Cyberbullying

From “The Karate Kid” to “How to Train Your Dragon” to “Little House on the Prairie,” bullying is a common theme that reflects the real issues children and young adults face when peers begin a campaign of hate. And because learning how to subdue a rare dragon or perform a threatening karate kick isn’t effective (or even realistic) in social settings, parents have struggled to find the best way to explain bullying and give their children the tools necessary to combat — or simply survive — the unwanted attention.

Even more confusing is the rise of cyberbullying — something most teachers, parents, or other adults have little experience with and may be unaware of as the exploitation occurs on private online networks or is hurled by anonymous users. This can’t be ignored, however. Nearly one in five children who use social networking sites is the victim of cyberbullying, according to a recent study by children’s charity NSCPP.

Hannah Smith, a 14-year-old girl living in England, was one victim of online bullying. Gabrielle Molina was teased and taunted online and in the classroom. Both of these young girls’ deaths have been linked to cyberbullying. Most recently, a 17-year-old boy living in Scotland took his life after communication with a person he believed to be a teenage girl turned out to be someone extorting money. Stalking and bullying online are serious threats to our children, and they require parents to remain vigilant in monitoring their children’s online habits.

Recognizing the Abuse 

The signs of cyberbullying are similar to those of “traditional” bullying. A bullied child will tend to be withdrawn, agitated, and reluctant to share conversation. He might suffer from loss of appetite, a decline in the quality of his schoolwork, general worry, or emotional upsets like crying for no apparent reason. 

Many times, the victim does not even know who the abuser is due to anonymous comments or user profiles. This leaves the child feeling paranoid, wondering who is making his life miserable and whether he knows the person in real life.

Unfortunately, the effects of cyberbullying aren’t limited to digital spaces. While the perpetrator might not attend the same school — or even be the same age — the child’s peers can read the comments online and bring them to life in the “real world.”

Why is cyberbullying so harmful? Many children have self-doubt, fear, and imposed beliefs that they are “no good,” and a few unkind words displayed on a message board can turn these common insecurities into total desperation. These messages can be reviewed again and again, and the hateful comments tend to be much harsher as abusers act more brazenly when sheltered by a screen.

Because it’s so difficult to stop or monitor online activity, parents need to support, guide, and help their children develop skills to combat the abuse and deal with the psychological aftermath. 

How to Fight Back

For many parents, their first reaction to an instance of bullying is to take away the cell phone, the Facebook account, and any online privileges. No cyber life means no cyberbullying, right?

However, this tactic can actually make things worse. For many children and young teens, having hundreds or thousands of contacts, Facebook friends, or Twitter followers is a measure of popularity and self-worth. The phone is a portal to their world. While some negativity and abuse might be coming through, closing the door entirely is not the answer. Taking privileges away can feel like a punishment during a time when the child really needs trust, support, and open communication with his parents.

That said, there are some steps a parent can take to make a child’s digital world safer right away:

  • If the abuse is happening through SMS, change the child’s cell phone number or block the abuser’s number.
  • Shut down any profiles or accounts where users are anonymous, such as Ask.fm. These sites attract users who prey on youthful insecurities.
  • Have an honest conversation about how to respond to hateful messages and how to understand the other person’s motivations.

If Things Get Worse

Bullying can become an unmanageable issue, especially if a child’s abusers attend the same school or participate in the same activities. Often, a child being bullied is viewed by other bullies as an easy target, and this results in a vicious cycle of hateful comments, teasing, and threats, both online and at school.

Create a team to address the issue. Include teachers, other parents, and siblings. Provide a supportive environment where the child can talk openly about the abuse and how he feels. If a young adult is uncomfortable discussing these issues with a parent, a coach or therapist could help him work through the bullying, regain his confidence, and reaffirm his values.

If threats have been made, you should immediately contact the police — even if it’s an online issue. Technology has become more sophisticated, and police departments may have the ability to track down the abuser through his or her digital signature. Hiring a lawyer or working with social services are also options for families or children who have experienced serious disruptions because of a cyber bully.

Having an online presence is a natural part of a young adult’s life today, so the most important thing you can do for your child is to instill in him the belief that he can discuss anything with you — including mistakes made online. If you make discussing online behavior and interactions a regular event, you can build a relationship in which online teasing, bullying, or even coercion are issues you fight together. 


For more than 30 years, Rod Beau has been an internationally sought-after education and management consultant and keynote speaker. His practical, real-world business experience and career have been in educational leadership, relocation consulting and executive and leadership coaching. As a Senior Consultant and Master Executive Coach, Rod is also an Accredited ANLP Trainer - specializing in Executive and Leadership Coaching. To learn more about Rod Beau, please visit www.sherpanlp.com

Source: www.sherpanlp.com

Have You Been Affected By Breast Cancer?

  • Have you been recently diagnosed with breast cancer? Are you overwhelmed by all of the draining thoughts and emotions that you are experiencing?
  • Are you in the middle of treatment and struggling with fatigue and experiencing stress?
  • Have you just finished treatment and feel like all of a sudden you are lost, your life has come to a complete halt or you feel like you have fallen off of a cliff?

If you fall into any of the above categories you are reading the right post!

I have the experience of being a caregiver to my mom, seeing my sister through a diagnosis of breast cancer and I have walked in your shoes as a breast cancer survivor myself and now as a survivorship coach. Through the incredible world of coaching, I help women cope, step by step, with the emotional and physical challenges they experience so that they can feel confident and in control of their lives again.

Unlike others that you are trying to connect to, I totally get where you are, what you are going through and trust me…EVERYTHING that you are experiencing is perfectly valid and normal as you walk through these life altering events! On top of all of, other “stuff” comes up as you walk each step along the way.  You change, relationships change, and your career may change. Life is all about change. The good news is that once we know and accept that change is a constant in our lives, we can manage it and that is all about the commitment that you have to loving yourself as an individual.  The next step is making a choice and commitment to yourself.

I help women going through each of the above stages transform their lives by owning and experiencing their emotions, getting to the bottom of where they are coming from and letting them pass so that you can shift to being present of a place of healing energy. I will educate you and ask you questions around how you can manage stress and reduce fatigue by changing your thoughts, patterns, and as a result your lifestyle.  We will look at how you show up in life, how that suits you and what you want to keep and what you want to let go of or change.  We will also work on adjusting on going from treatment back to daily living. In the relationship as coach and client you will be able to finally move from being “stuck” to a place to where you are feeling peaceful, at ease, accepting of and I control of your life once again.

Please reach out to me if you are interested in working together and entering into a coaching relationship where we will create a safe and healing environment and the space to create sustainable change in living your New Beginning.


Gina Costa, CPC, ELI-MP is the founder of New Beginnings Coaching Services, LLC, which helps women diagnosed with breast cancer cope, step by step, with the emotional and physical challenges they experience, so they gain confidence and feel in control of their life again. To learn more about Gina and her coaching practice, visit http://www.newbeginningswithgina.com/

Source: http://www.newbeginningswithgina.com/

5 Tips For Menopause

Menopause at 47, 51 or 60 is no reason to accept someone else’s idea of what your limitations are.  We can all be destined to have vibrant health before, during and after menopause and banish years of discomfort and hormone imbalances.  In fact now is the time to discover the best in yourself, including your power to finally deal with some core issues that can lead  to weight gain, depression, brain fog, hot flashes and insomnia. 

1-Listen to a thyroid that has been overloaded with toxins for years. Thyroid issues may be highly aggravated by the onset of menopause.  In fact Menopause &  Thyroid Symptoms may look alike. These are, Exhaustion, Brain Fog, Depression, Lethargy, Changes in Energy, Hair Loss, Changes in Skin Color and Hair Texture, Change in Libido, Insomnia, and Anxiety. 

2- The Digestive, adrenal, inflammation connection.  Leaky Gut could be implicated as a primary contributor to  food allergies, migraines and RA.  There may be toxins in our system which may add to a broader pattern of inflammation which often shows up during Menopause.  Many women have been sensitive to certain foods for decades but only realize it after they lose estrogen’s soothing effect on the digestive tract.   

“Most allergies involve an inflammatory process.  As the adrenal function decreases, allergies worsen.  As the adrenal glands heal, allergies are markedly reduced.” http://cassiopaea.org/forum/index.php?topic=488.15 

3- Sugar is an endocrine disruptor and robs the body of nutrients, testosterone, B 12 and Calcium.  Sugar can increase insomnia, mood swings and body fat, cause inflammation and high cholesterol levels in the body.  Hypoglycemia increases menopausal symptoms and mood swings.  Sugar also reduces the amount of oxygen in the blood and thus increasing the impact that toxins can create in the body.   The body will find a way to get rid of toxins and this typically results in the body saying “Too many toxins…must sweat these out through the largest organ, “The Skin.” (hot flashes) 

4- Commonalities to Menopause are Cravings, Inflammation, Emotions and Hormonal Imbalances.  Did you know many symptoms of Candida overgrowth such as weight gain,  muscle fatigue and early menopause can be caused by hormonal imbalances?  Candida can also be a causative factor to cravings.  In Menopause, the links between hormonal balance, toxicity, inflammation and body fat aren’t the only factors that block weight loss. Unresolved emotional issues can often be the root cause of unhealthy eating habits.

Hormones are tremendously powerful in coordinating the actions of our organs and glands and affecting our quality of life!  Low estrogen levels can cause depression, headaches, migraines, and blood sugar irregularities.  Migraines explained.  http://eepurl.com/ZH-cz 

Progesterone is derived from cholesterol.  Cholesterol levels can change with menopause.  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10916282  “Without inflammation being present in the body, there is no way that cholesterol would accumulate in the wall of the blood vessel which can be dangerous.  Without inflammation, cholesterol would move freely throughout the body as nature intended.  It is inflammation that causes cholesterol to become trapped.” (Dr. Dwight Lundell)

5- A clogged lymph system can cause headaches.  When our lymph is clogged our body looks for alternative ways to get rid of the trash.  Plan B is making mucous out of it.  Lots of mucous in the morning can be a symptom of a problem.  By gently promoting the movement of lymph with dry brushing, the body detoxifies and decongests. http://www.wisegeekhealth.com/what-is-the-function-of-the-lymphatic-system.htm

With stress, inflammation and hormone changes sometimes we forget to take a moment to breathe.

Here are some tips: 

A- Deep breathing is one of the best ways to move lymph fluid through your body.  Our lymph system is a pressure system that runs best on physical activity and movement.  Our lymph can become blocked when we are feeling stuck or unable to express ourself.” http://www.womentowomen.com/detoxification/the-lymph-system-and-your-health-2/ 

B- Stress can negatively affect the adrenal glands and increase inflammation.  Begin an exercise program.  Exercise improves mood, prevents dementia and balances hormones.

 C- Remember to Hydrate Your Body, and avoid mucus forming foods such as sugar, gluten, rBGH dairy and processed foods..

Follow thru with lifestyle changes and get the support you need, feel better and see results.

To optimize Your Health Go To:  http://lp.bitesizepieces.netTuneupandTuneintoyourHormones.html

Copyright2014@ConnieRogers


Connie Rogers is an Expert in toxins that can disrupt our skin, metabolic and endocrine health. Lifestyle Educator, Reiki Master, 37 years Certified Cosmetologist/Esthetician, Certified Integrated Holistic Health Coach, Accredited through American Association of Drugless Practitioners, Published Author, Wellness Writer, Owner Reverseage Wellness Essential Oils

Connect Linkedin: Connie Rogers

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A Hot Topic: Acid Reflux

People with acid reflux find comfort sleeping in a favorite chair, sometimes never returning to their bed.

Acid reflux is often just one of many digestive symptoms that can result from poor digestion, food intolerances, chronic stress, gut infections, and other factors.  Up to 15 million people have a condition called acid reflux or GERD.  GERD occurs when the lower esophageal sphincter, a kind of trap door into the stomach, doesn't close properly. Stomach contents leak back into the esophagus, causing the burning sensation called heartburn. Heartburn that occurs more than twice a week may be considered GERD and can eventually lead to more serious health problems.

Despite what the commercials say, GERD is not caused by too much stomach acid.  It's caused by acid in the wrong place -- our esophagus.

Digestion is a metabolic issue and so is acid reflux:

One study of 155 healthy people who had used antacids for long periods of time found that 47% suffered some erosion of the esophagus. Regular antacid use also impairs the stomach’s ability to digest protein. Finally, without the right amount of stomach acidity, “friendly” bacteria that contribute to digestion die, leaving you at risk for low-level microbial infections that can lead to chronic indigestion.

{"Upset Stomach? The Right PH," Family Health, Taste for Life magazine, Nov. 2000}

Should we take a pill?

Heartburn remedies are among the biggest selling drugs of all time. But you should think long and hard before you pop that Pepcid.

Stomach acid is required for good digestion. Poor digestion produces heartburn. Your health is riding on your body's ability to absorb nutrients.  People with heart-burn take antacids.  Antacids reduce stomach acid. Oh no-more heartburn!  

“Paradoxically, 90 percent of people who experience heartburn, don't have enough acid.” ( Dr. Jonny Bowden)

What About Side Effects?

“If you are taking Proton-pump-inhibitor drugs like Prilosec, Nexium, Tagamet, etc. these can reduce the acidity of the stomach, but in so doing create a more favorable environment for bad bacteria such as H. Pylori.”  Our gut needs good bacteria for good health. They go hand and hand.

Nearly every disease originating in the human body is due to or accompanied by the excessive formation of different kinds of acids in the system, the most important of which are uric, carbonic, sulphuric, phosphoric and oxalic acids. (Nature Cure by Henry Lindlahr, MD)

Unfortunately, medications for GERD may increase the risk of certain cancers and change our delicate pH balance. These are serious health concerns, and it's pretty clear that in this case, the "cure" of acid-blocking drugs are worse than the "disease" of GERD.  "Blocking stomach acid, also increases our risk of developing small intestinal bacterial overgrowth.” (taken from Digestive Wellness by Elizabeth Lipski.)

Antacids can result in issues in other areas:

1- Vitamin B-12 deficiency may be caused by the acid-suppressing drugs that people are taking (Previcet and Prilosec)

2 - A study in the Journal of the American Medical Association found that chronic use of acid-blocking drugs leads to an increase in the development of osteoporosis and increase in hip fracture because blocking acid prevents the absorption of calcium and other minerals necessary for bone health. (Yang, Y., Lewis, J.D., Epstein, S., and David Metz. 2006. Long-term proton pump inhibitor therapy and risk of hip fracture. JAMA. 296(24): 2947-2953.)

Antacids interfere with the absorption of copper:

http://www.healthaliciousness.com/articles/high-copper-foods.php#13XVQRfPMfm8W1vl.99

Copper is an essential mineral required by the body for bone and connective tissue production, and for coding specific enzymes that range in function from eliminating free radicals to producing melanin.  A deficiency in copper can lead to osteoporosis, joint pain, and lowered immunity.

You can't assimilate nutrients until they have been adequately broken down by digestion:

Antacids neutralize the acids in our stomach, making it difficult to break down foods into small enough particles to be absorbed. Once partially digested foods leave our stomach, our body treats this partially digested food, as foreign. The resulting immune response can result in food insensitivities and fatigue.  Added to this is the upset of the balance of friendly bacteria needed for a healthy immune system.  {taken from "Digestion Problems," Women's Health Letter, Nan Fuchs, PhD, Feb. 2002}

Neurological side effects:

1 - Taking certain types of medication to deal with heartburn and excess stomach acid may increase the risk of cognitive impairment in the elderly, according to a report in the August issue of the Journal of the American Geriatric Society. The drugs in question, called histamine-2 receptor antagonists or H2As, include popular medicines such as Zantac and Pepcid.

2 - Antacids taken to fight indigestion actually diminish the enzymes needed to digest foods and nutrients critical to proper brain function.

{taken from: Journal of Natural Healing Breakthroughs, “Health Alert,” Dr. Bruce West}

 Antacids merely mask symptoms instead of handling the real problem:

Gurkipal Singh of Stanford University reported that people taking antacids and H2-blockers suffered more than twice as many serious gastrointestinal complications than those given placebos.

What could make normal stomach digestive fluids flow up where they don't belong?  One is overeating.  One can be from eating an abundance of pesticides and chemicals in our food. One can be food combining.  Another can be eating a big meal before bed. “Late night eating can trigger GERD”. (taken from Digestive Wellness by Elizabeth Lipski.)


Connie Rogers is an Expert in toxins that can disrupt our skin, metabolic and endocrine health. Lifestyle Educator, Reiki Master, 37 years Certified Cosmetologist/Esthetician, Certified Integrated Holistic Health Coach, Accredited through American Association of Drugless Practitioners, Published Author, Wellness Writer, Owner Reverseage Wellness Essential Oils

Connect Linkedin: Connie Rogers

https://www.facebook.com/ReverseageWellnessSpa

www.bitesizepieces.net

Source: www.bitesizepieces.net

Changes

Chchchch...changes...    (cue David Bowie!)

On any given day, week, month or year, changes can astound, overwhelm, and/or, surprise us.  Some change is welcome and some is not.

I hear a lot of people say they don’t like change.  I am hearing their remarks as referring to those changes that upset their routines or thinking. 

I have encountered a number of changes in my life.  I transitioned from my full-time job in order to pursue my dream job of coaching and consulting full time; I’ve moved and lived in about 15 different places in my life; and more recently my front porch fell apart.  With each decision, address change, and removal of a piece of something, other aspect of a new reality needed to be addressed or repaired.  Things are not always as they appear to be and yet we can either plow through or fly free to get where we want to be.

This leads me to the changes that upset our thinking.  We are so closely aligned and committed to our way of thinking that we can hold on for dear life just so we don’t have to think differently about a person or situation.  We like our opinions.  We like how our perception orders our world and our place in it.  It is what we do with new information that can either lead us to new insights or root us deeper in our place.  Each has value.  The challenge is learning to know which to apply and when. 

Back to the porch…Once it was revealed that the sheathing behind the siding was damaged from a water leak I had two choices; 1) was to remove the siding, replace the sheathing (and subsequent insulation) and put it all back together again with all new materials or 2) do nothing knowing that the sheathing was damaged, but not structurally impaired and just cover it up again and make it look nice.  In case you are wondering, I chose the first option!

Changes take us to a decision point.

·         We recognize that things can’t go on like they were before and we have to take steps to move to the next phase of our life or career or,

·         We can become frozen in place.  And well, you know the saying, “Not to decide is to decide.”  We think if we take no action or deny that an action needs to be taken we can bide our time in making a decision.  

Whether you move forward in a conscious way or stand still and do nothing, remember, future changes are already taking shape for another day. 

Tune in to the next show that I am hosting on the Life Coach Chat Channel on Wednesday, August 13th at 1:00 PM titled: Do I or Don’t I: Taking that Leap of Faith Into Something New.


Barbara Hetzel is the Founder of Ridge Top Coaching, a life and leadership-coaching firm that engages leaders and teams in developing and expanding their gifts and talents for the world.  As an accomplished professional in the field of training and organizational development, she has over 25 years of experience helping others discover and embrace their true calling.